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Article
September 29, 1923

PERICOLIC MEMBRANES SIMULATING CARCINOMA OF THE COLON

JAMA. 1923;81(13):1096-1098. doi:10.1001/jama.1923.02650130034008
Abstract

In the past year, we have operated in two cases in which the clinical diagnosis of carcinoma of the ascending colon had been made. At operation, the true condition was found to be partial obstruction due to unusually peculiar vascular adhesions. The reason for our mistakes in diagnosis may be apparent from the following case reports.

REPORT OF CASES 

Case 1.—History.  —L. A. S., a woman, aged 60, white, American, married, complained of weakness, anemia, loss of weight, constipation and nervousness. She was referred to the surgical service, Dec. 21, 1920, by Dr. William Lintz of the department of medicine. The family and personal history had no essential bearing on the present illness.About eight weeks before admission, the patient first noticed vertigo on getting up in the morning. Since that time, she had been getting progressively weaker; had noticed that she became fatigued on slight exertion, and had

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