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Article
June 27, 1925

MELANOMA OF THE RECTUM: REPORT OF CASE

Author Affiliations

NEW HAVEN, CONN.
From the Brady Laboratory of Pathology and Bacteriology, Yale University School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1925;84(26):1986-1987. doi:10.1001/jama.1925.02660520014006
Abstract

The literature on the subject of melanomas is being constantly augmented by additional reports of the occurrence of this condition. Most of these reports deal with instances of tumors which have arisen in the usual sites, namely, the congenital nevi of the skin, the pigmented choroid of the eye, and the choroid plexus, but which present certain features of interest worthy of record. However, melanomas are described that arise from cells in which pigment is not known to be present normally; e. g., the ovary,1 the ileum, the rectum, the common bile duct and the suprarenals. Such observations have developed some discussion as to whether these tumors are made up of melanotic pigmented cells that originate in the epidermis and pass into the dermis and deeper tissues, or whether they are mesoblastic cells that have acquired the ability to form melanin (Ribbert's chromatophoroma), for it is generally agreed that

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