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Article
June 27, 1925

REDUCTION OF INCREASED INTRACRANIAL PRESSURE: BY INTRAVENOUS ADMINISTRATION OF GLUCOSE AND HYPERTONIC RINGER'S SOLUTION

Author Affiliations

ANN ARBOR, MICH.
From the Department of Surgery, University of Michigan Medical School.

JAMA. 1925;84(26):1994-1996. doi:10.1001/jama.1925.02660520022010
Abstract

The old, empiric treatment for head injuries consisted of rest in bed, morphin and large doses of magnesium sulphate. The rationale of this not being evident, it was discarded in many clinics. However, experimental work by Weed and McKibben 1 demonstrated that cerebrospinal fluid pressure and brain volume were both reduced by the intravenous administration of hypertonic solutions of various salts and of glucose. Cushing and Foley 2 reported similar results through the ingestion of hypertonic solutions, and later Foley and Putnam3 obtained like effects by intra-intestinal administration. Clinical application of these experimental findings was reported by a number of workers, particularly by Cushing and Foley,2 Sachs and Belcher,4 Ebaugh and Stevenson,5 Hughson 6 and Fay.7 Thus was the empiric administration of magnesium sulphate for traumatic intracranial lesions confirmed and its use reestablished.

It has been shown that nearly identical results in the reduction of

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