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Article
July 4, 1925

SINUSITIS AND SWIMMING: FURTHER OBSERVATIONS OF ETIOLOGIC FACTORS, WITH SPECIAL EMPHASIS ON MAN'S LACK OF ADAPTATION TO AQUATIC HABITS

Author Affiliations

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

JAMA. 1925;85(1):7-10. doi:10.1001/jama.1925.02670010011003
Abstract

In recent years, the advances in medicine along bacteriologic and immunologic lines have opened up such tremendous fields for research that they have to some extent overshadowed some other branches of medicine of paramount importance and tended to relegate them to the background. Biology, the fundamental study of all phenomena of life and its manifold relations, is one of the branches of science that cannot be ignored. We must always bear in mind, as Dendy 1 has said, "Man derives his existence from the same ultimate sources and is subject to the same natural laws as all the other living things with which he shares the earth."

The literature dealing with the subject of infections of the upper respiratory passages caused by swimming has to a large extent ignored the fact that man has few structural adaptations for an aquatic environment, but has in a large measure dealt with only

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