[Skip to Navigation]
Article
July 4, 1925

PERNICIOUS ANEMIA, FOLLOWING ILEOSTOMY

Author Affiliations

Fellows in Surgery, the Mayo Foundation; ROCHESTER, MINN.

JAMA. 1925;85(1):17-20. doi:10.1001/jama.1925.02670010021006
Abstract

The acute toxemia resulting from disturbance of the normal motor mechanism of the upper intestinal tract has been investigated in recent years, and it is now known that with high intestinal intoxication there may be no actual mechanical obstruction or vomiting. This work points indirectly to the possibility of equally serious results from more chronic types of physiologic disturbance in the intestinal tract. It has been shown that toxic substances may be derived from protein. Iwao1 produced very marked anemia resembling the pernicious type by injecting tyramin into animals. This substance has been isolated from decomposing meat, and has been produced by the action of colon bacilli on tyrosin. Colon bacilli are normally found in the ileum; Hurst2 and Wichels3 also found them in the stomach and very abundantly in the small intestines in cases of pernicious anemia. Under normal conditions, the colon bacillus in the small

×