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Article
October 6, 1923

GIANT-CELL TUMOR OF THE LOWER END OF THE RADIUS: REPORT OF CASE

Author Affiliations

SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS

JAMA. 1923;81(14):1179-1183. doi:10.1001/jama.1923.02650140023009
Abstract

Probably no medical subject presents greater uncertainty than the study of bone neoplasms. Even a cursory examination of the literature reveals decided differences in classification and treatment, incident to which there is considerable confusion. An outstanding feature in these observations is a tendency toward conservatism in dealing with new growths of bony structures. To illustrate this, it may be well to preface our subject proper by a few general remarks and a recapitulation of some axioms of Bloodgood and others. Vagueness as well as apparent disagreements may be explained, at least in part, by:

  1. The comparative infrequency of bone tumors. Since only a limited number of cases have been studied, statistical values are only relative.

  2. Dependence on roentgen-ray findings which have not been accurately correlated with clinical and laboratory data. Take, for example, the fallacy of trying to make a positive differential diagnosis roentgenologically between benign bone cyst,

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