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Article
October 6, 1923

A STUDY OF HILUM GLAND ENLARGEMENT IN A GROUP OF TUBERCULOUS CHILDREN

JAMA. 1923;81(14):1191-1194. doi:10.1001/jama.1923.02650140035012
Abstract

The diagnosis of tuberculosis in children is often a difficult one to make. Because of the fact that the infection is, in most instances, a glandular rather than a pulmonary one, there are usually few, if any, physical findings present. If the glands affected are those in the cervical region, the diagnosis is not so difficult. But in the majority of cases, the hilum glands are the ones involved, and in these it is often extremely hard to find any evidence, at least by physical examination, of any involvement. Aside from the general findings of undernourishment, poor muscle tone and posture of fatigue, which are often present, the only physical signs which point to hilum gland tuberculosis are those that are related to enlargement of these glands. D'Espine,1 in 1889, called attention to a method of diagnosing hilum gland enlargement; since then there has been considerable written in regard

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