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October 6, 1923

THE LABYRINTHINE TESTS IN CEREBELLAR DIAGNOSIS

Author Affiliations

PORTLAND, ORE.

JAMA. 1923;81(14):1194-1197. doi:10.1001/jama.1923.02650140038013
Abstract

Bárány's labyrinthine studies, initiated in the years 1907-1909, and followed up in this country more particularly by the work of Jones and Fisher, have stimulated our interest in the borderland that lies between the fields of neurology and otology. They have led to a more careful analysis of vertigo and nystagmus, symptoms common to the two fields; and in past pointing, have introduced an additional method of studying cerebellar disturbances.

The field of usefulness for the labyrinthine tests is clearly defined by the anatomic limits of the labyrinthine pathways, and can be deduced from those limits. It includes: (1) the labyrinth and the vestibular nerves; (2) the brain stem, especially the upper medulla and pons; (3) the cerebellum—the end organ for the labyrinthine impulses, and (4) indirectly, may give some information regarding lesions of the cerebrum itself.

In a general way, study of the labyrinth and the vestibular nerve, and

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