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October 13, 1923

THE PSYCHOLOGY OF THE NORMAL CHILD

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO

JAMA. 1923;81(15):1260-1262. doi:10.1001/jama.1923.02650150014005
Abstract

The mind of the child differs from that of the adult quite as much, and in much the same way, as his body differs from that of the adult. Certain traits are his at birth and are modifiable only to a slight degree; on the other hand, changes for good or ill can be wrought in his mind which are as marked as are the changes sometimes seen in the bodies of certain primitive peoples who mold heads and alter features after a marvelous fashion.

Every child comes into the world with a set of tendencies transmitted through the ages from two long lines of ancestors. He is what he is largely because of his family, his sex and his race. Education may do much to develop small or latent powers, but nature has set definite limits for each individual beyond which he cannot go. It is futile to try

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