[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
July 11, 1925

RELATION OF INTRANASAL DISEASE IN THE PRODUCTION OF BRONCHIAL ASTHMA: REPORT OF CASES

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Department of Oto-Laryngology at Beth Israel Hospital.

JAMA. 1925;85(2):105-108. doi:10.1001/jama.1925.02670020025013
Abstract

Nasal accessory sinus disease is a very common finding in patients suffering with bronchial asthma. Because of this occurrence, many thoughtful investigators have suggested that there is an etiologic relation between disease in the paranasal sinuses and this baffling malady. There are four conceivable ways by which the symptom complex called asthma may be produced through nasal disease. Mucopurulent material may drip into the pharynx from an infected sinus and the infection gradually involve the mucous membrane of the trachea and bronchi. Mucopurulent material may be retained in a sinus and the toxic products be absorbed through the blood stream or lymphatics or both and produce allergic phenomena that may manifest themselves in asthma. The nose may be obstructed by polypi and enlarged turbinates, and the patient is compelled to breathe constantly through the mouth, and the effect of cold and dry inspired air, combined with the presence of infected

×