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Article
October 20, 1923

ADAMS-STOKES' SYNDROME, HEART BLOCK, IN ASSOCIATION WITH DIABETES MELLITUS

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA
From the Department of Medicine, Jefferson Medical College.

JAMA. 1923;81(16):1342-1345. doi:10.1001/jama.1923.02650160016005
Abstract

Adams-Stokes' syndrome is a term that has been applied to conditions characterized by a slow pulse with transient attacks of vertigo, syncope and epileptiform seizures. These symptoms are due to cerebral anemia induced by the slow action or temporary stoppage of the ventricles. Experiments on animals have confirmed the views held previously by clinicians that convulsions may be produced by a marked lessening or temporary shutting off of the blood supply to the brain.

Adams-Stokes' syndrome and heart block are not synonymous terms, the former being descriptive of a clinical symptom complex, and the latter describing a condition in which there is a partial or complete failure of the auricular impulse to reach the ventricle. Heart block frequently does not present any symptoms.

Adams-Stokes' syndrome is usually associated with some form of heart block. Conditions other than heart block, in which the pulse rate is infrequent, or in which there

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