[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
August 8, 1925

BERIBERI FROM A DIET OF RAW STARCH

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA
From the Neurologic Service of Dr. W. G. Spiller, Philadelphia General Hospital.

JAMA. 1925;85(6):409-412. doi:10.1001/jama.1925.02670060011003
Abstract

Beriberi is seen so infrequently in the United States that its occurrence is worthy of mention. Cases of the disease do occur from time to time, but chiefly among the crews of vessels landing in our ports or among the Orientals. Vedder1 has shown that the disease has been fairly common in our asylums and penal institutions, and since the publication of his work epidemics in prisons have been reported by both Travis2 and Livengood.3 Sporadic cases occur from time to time, but they are exceedingly rare, especially in this part of the country. The probable reason for our fortunate freedom from the disease lies in the fact that even in our lowest social strata the standards of living are sufficiently high to prevent its occurrence.

The etiology of beriberi is now generally accepted to be a deficiency in the diet of a specific vitamin known as

×