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Article
November 24, 1923

THE FACTOR OF DILUTION IN GASTRIC ANALYSIS

Author Affiliations

ST. LOUIS
From the Departments of Medicine and Biological Chemistry of Washington University Medical School.

JAMA. 1923;81(21):1738-1742. doi:10.1001/jama.1923.02650210004002
Abstract

The great variety of "acidity curves" as obtained by the fractional method of gastric analysis, and the different acid concentrations as determined by the single

aspiration method, have been interpreted mainly in the light of secretory variations. The factor of unknown dilution of the acid by the commonly used test meal has been ignored.

In both the single aspiration and the fractional methods of gastric analysis, it is customary to give as part of the test meal (Ewald, Dock and Boas' oatmeal gruel) from 150 to 500 c.c. of fluid on the fasting stomach or after the removal of the fasting contents.1 In the single aspiration method, the gastric contents are removed at forty-five minutes or one hour after the test meal, and the acidity is determined. In the fractional method, samples (from 6 to 15 c.c.) of gastric contents

are taken at fifteen minute intervals for a definite period,

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