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Article
August 22, 1925

FATE OF THE RED BLOOD CELLS IN PERNICIOUS ANEMIA

JAMA. 1925;85(8):612-613. doi:10.1001/jama.1925.02670080056014
Abstract

The formation and death of the red blood corpuscles furnish part of the story of the changes that make up the "procession of life." Unlike some of the other cells of the body, the erythrocytes are not formed once for all at birth, but those present in the blood stream represent the momentary residuum of antagonistic processes.5 Today it is certain that a disintegration of red corpuscles takes place constantly, in sickness and in health. New demands are usually coped with successfully, so far as concerns the immediate task of accomplishing additional destruction, when that is necessary, or disposing of the products of a breaking down unprovoked by the body. But for such emergency purposes, other mechanisms besides the normal must frequently be called on. It is the interplay and substitute activities of these reserve mechanisms, Rous has remarked, that make conclusions so difficult on the normal as well

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