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Article
October 3, 1925

EXOPHTHALMIC GOITER (GRAVES' SYNDROME) AND INVOLUNTARY NERVOUS SYSTEM: XII. PATHOGENESIS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Medical Department, Mount Sinai Hospital, and the Department of Pharmacology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.

JAMA. 1925;85(14):1017-1022. doi:10.1001/jama.1925.02670140003002
Abstract

The abstract discussion of the pathogenesis of exophthalmic goiter may serve a threefold purpose-the interpretation of known data, the suggestion of avenues of approach for future study, and the development of a rational therapeutic regimen.

As we have previously shown,1 the symptoms of exophthalmic goiter are identical with those which may be produced in any individual by effective doses of a sympathomimetic substance. We are still convinced that the participation of the involuntary nervous system is an important element in the evolution of exophthalmic goiter. Accordingly, a discussion of the pathogenesis of exophthalmic goiter necessitates a preliminary inquiry into the factors that may control the involuntary nervous system in health and disease.

The involuntary nervous system may produce the manifestations of exophthalmic goiter through the intervention of some unknown circulating sympathomimetic substance or substances. Thus far, attempts to demonstrate such a substance in effectual concentration in the circulating fluids

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