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Article
January 5, 1924

CALCIFICATION OF RENAL VEIN WITH BILATERAL NEPHROLITHIASIS: REPORT OF CASE

Author Affiliations

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C.

JAMA. 1924;82(1):25-27. doi:10.1001/jama.1924.02650270029009
Abstract

Anomalies of the renal veins in size, position, number, anastomoses with other organs, etc., are quite common, but we have found no report in the surgical literature of calcification of a renal vein accompanying kidney stones. Personal communications from various leading clinics fail to reveal any similar case.

Embryologically, the kidney vessels are well developed by the end of the seventh week of fetal life. The veins are primarily outgrowths from the cardinal veins. Later, as these veins atrophy, the renal veins communicate directly with the vena cava. Anatomically, the anastomosis between the smaller veins is quite free, for, unlike the arterial supply in the so-called "bloodless area," the veins cross from the dorsal to the ventral half of the kidney through the intercalical branches. There is also an inner and outer system of anastomosis by means of the venous arches and polar systems, insuring free egress to the blood

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