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Article
October 17, 1925

CANCER MORTALITY IN THE TEN ORIGINAL REGISTRATION STATES: TREND FOR THE PERIOD 1900-1920

Author Affiliations

Surgeon, U. S. Public Health Service BOSTON

JAMA. 1925;85(16):1175-1180. doi:10.1001/jama.1925.02670160001001
Abstract

The progressive increase in the cancer death rates shown in the mortality statistics in practically all civilized countries has invited the serious attention of students of the public health. The more optimistic are of the opinion that these increases in the death rate may be accounted for by improvements in medical diagnosis, increase in the accuracy of vital statistics in general, greater precision in filling out death returns, changes in the age distribution of the population and similar factors.

Yet others are inclined to a gloomier view of the situation. They hold that the magnitude of the observed increases in the death rate is too great, too general in its distribution to be accounted for in any such way, so that the apparent is also an actual increase in the cancer mortality.

Because of the importance and interest of this question, it was thought well worth while to attempt a

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