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Article
January 19, 1924

THE USE OF CONVALESCENT SERUM IN THE PROPHYLAXIS OF MEASLES

JAMA. 1924;82(3):204-206. doi:10.1001/jama.1924.02650290034010
Abstract

Measles is so universal that many people consider it a trivial disease. Ker1 states that of 14,000 persons, 97.3 per cent, of those over 15 years of age had had the disease. As a cause of death in children it ranks third from the highest among the acute contagious diseases. In the registration area of the United States2 in 1920 there were 7,712 deaths from measles-a rate of 8.8 per hundred thousand. Of these, 78 per cent, were of children under 5 years of age. In Chicago from 1917 to 1921 there were 718 deaths from measles, 90.6 per cent, of which were in children under 5 years of age. Under exceptional circumstances, measles may become a serious disease for young adults. Those familiar with the epidemics in our army camps during the World War recall the heavy mortality from measles and pneumonia. But under ordinary conditions young

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