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Article
February 2, 1924

THE LENS AS SEEN WITH THE GULLSTRAND SLIT LAMP AND CORNEAL MICROSCOPE

JAMA. 1924;82(5):363-370. doi:10.1001/jama.1924.02650310017007
Abstract

The Gullstrand slit lamp, combined with the corneal microscope, has made it possible for us to study the lens in more minute detail than ever before. The normal and pathologic changes in capsule and cortex heretofore difficult of examination are now more easily interpreted.

THE CAPSULE  The anterior capsule consists of irregular quadrate cells which look like a tile mosaic; the surface may be smooth but it is most often rough, giving the impression we get from a cocain dryness of the cornea. At other times, many reflections from its surface recall craters on the moon. On the capsule may be found pigment deposits; star cells, rounded masses or lines. Remnants of the pupillary membrane may show as a distinct grayish-white accretion from which fibers pass to the iris, or as broad, white bands which come from behind the iris and often carry rounded pigment plaques. The capsule may become

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