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Article
February 2, 1924

TYPHOID IN THE LARGE CITIES OF THE UNITED STATES IN 1923: TWELFTH ANNUAL REPORT

JAMA. 1924;82(5):389-391. doi:10.1001/jama.1924.26520310003014
Abstract

The Journal presents its twelfth annual survey1 of typhoid fever mortality in the cities of the United States that had more than 100,000 population in 1920. The statistics of the fourteenth census showed that

there were in that year sixty-nine cities with a population of more than 100,000. These may be conveniently considered for our purpose in six groups. More than one fourth of the population of the United States lives in these cities, and nearly one sixth lives in the twelve cities with more than 500,000 population.2

As has been the case since 1920, every one of the twelve largest cities (Group 1, more than 500,000 population) had a typhoid death rate under 10 (Table 2). For the first time since these summaries were begun, every city in the group had a rate under 5. Although 1922 marked the lowest point heretofore reached for several cities in

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