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Article
July 5, 1930

ERYSIPELOID: REPORT OF CASE OF INFECTION ACQUIRED FROM FISH OF GREAT LAKES

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Division of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, University of Chicago.

JAMA. 1930;95(1):26. doi:10.1001/jama.1930.02720010030010
Abstract

Erysipeloid is an acute inflammatory disease, starting in the skin, at times extending more deeply, producing cellulitis or lymphangitis and lymphadenopathy, sometimes accompanied by general symptoms. It is due to an organism supposedly identical with that causing swine erysipelas (Erysipelothrix suis). The incubation period is two days, and the duration of the infection is from one to eight weeks. The disease was reported from Europe as occurring after inoculation into a wound of decomposed animal matter, fish or cheese. Reports in this country have been confined to the Atlantic seaboard (Gilchrist,1 Klauder2), with the exception of Wile's3 report of a similar condition in fishermen of the Great Lakes. We have had the opportunity to study an unrecognized case of erysipeloid, and are reporting it to call attention to its presence about the Great Lakes and to record good results from the use of specific serum.

REPORT OF 

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