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Article
November 14, 1925

THE FEMALE SEX HORMONE: II. AN ANALYSIS OF FACTORS PRODUCING PUBERTY

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK; DENVER
From the Research Department, National Jewish Hospital for Consumptives, Denver; the Department of Anatomy, University of Colorado School of Medicine, and the Chemical Laboratory, Denver University.

JAMA. 1925;85(20):1558-1559. doi:10.1001/jama.1925.02670200036010
Abstract

Why, in a given species, puberty sets in at a fairly fixed period of time has always remained a mystery. In recent years various glands of internal secretion have, without real evidence, been credited with a restraining or accelerating influence. Clinical record of premature puberty has accumulated and has shown that pineal, suprarenal or ovarian neoplasms are most often causative, although cases in which no abnormality other than the precocious puberty is discoverable are also not unusual (Lenz;1 Reuben and Manning2).

Premature puberty can be experimentally induced by the injection of lipoid extracts of corpus luteum, placenta or follicle fluid. Such experiments have been performed since 1913 on rabbits, guinea-pigs and albino rats (Aschner;3 Fellner;4 Frank and Rosenbloom;5 Frank;6 Allen and Doisy;7 Frank and Gustavson8). The effect shows itself in a marked hyperplasia of the female genital tubular system (vulva, vagina, uterus)

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