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Article
November 28, 1925

PULMONARY IMMUNIZATION: ITS BEARING ON THE ORIGIN OF ANTIBODIES

Author Affiliations

Professor of Bacteriology and Experimental Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine; STANFORD UNIVERSITY, CALIF.

JAMA. 1925;85(22):1729. doi:10.1001/jama.1925.02670220047015
Abstract

Contrasted with our wealth of knowledge concerning changes in blood plasma and in tissue lymph during immunization, the almost total lack of knowledge concerning possible immunologic adaptations in fixed tissues is a striking fact. Nevertheless, there is reason to believe that immunologic adaptation of fixed tissues plays an important rôle in bodily resistance, the dominant rôle in the immunity against certain infectious disseases.1 Adequate knowledge of fixed tissue changes in immunity may in time give therapeutic methods as valuable as the methods that have thus far resulted from serum study.

Practically the only physiologic studies so far made of immune tissues are a few tests of the reactions of isolated smooth muscle and isolated lungs of immune guinea-pigs. Perfused free from circulating antibodies, these tissues are apparently identical, physiologically, with anaphylactic tissues.2 This has led to the tentative generalization that bodily adaptations in immunity probably consist of the

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