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Article
March 15, 1924

THE BOTANY OF SOUTHWEST TEXAS, WITH REFERENCE TO HAY-FEVER AND ASTHMA

Author Affiliations

SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS

JAMA. 1924;82(11):871-873. doi:10.1001/jama.1924.02650370039013
Abstract

This article is the result of a year's study of glycerin pollen plates exposed twenty-four hours, later stained with compound solution of iodin, and examined twice each week. The plates were exposed in both the residence and business districts of San Antonio; in addition, a number of plates have been studied from Houston, Dallas, Corpus Christi and smaller cities nearer San Antonio. The actual field botany work and identification of specimens were done in connection with Miss Ellen Schulz, professor of botany in the San Antonio high schools, and Mr. Wallace Butler of the local U. S. Agricultural Experimental Station.

GRASSES  Grasses of numerous species in and about San Antonio grow profusely and constitute, by all odds, the most important pollen factor locally in hay-fever and asthma. The earliest pollen of the year found in the air was that of winter grass (Bromus unioloides), which has a short pollination season

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