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Article
March 22, 1924

MEDICINE AND THE COMMUNITY OF SCIENTIFIC THOUGHT

JAMA. 1924;82(12):968. doi:10.1001/jama.1924.02650380036014
Abstract

Medicine no longer stands alone as a discipline independent of the numerous other activities that engage the attention of the world's intelligence. More and more, the sciences that were formerly conceived as succinct fields of human interest and carefully walled off, as it were, from one another, have been found to merge so that the boundaries of their scope are no longer easily recognized. A few years ago it was customary to speak of certain borderline sciences, such as physical chemistry and physiologic psychology. Today it almost seems as if even the most fundamental sciences are so thoroughly interwoven in respect to point of view, technic and even content that there is a sort of continuity to the fabric. The major sciences in general are gradually exhibiting the characteristics of the borderline areas of a decade or two ago. The story of the atom runs alike through the pages of

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