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Article
January 16, 1926

THE RÔLE OF INSULIN IN CARBOHYDRATE METABOLISM

JAMA. 1926;86(3):200-201. doi:10.1001/jama.1926.02670290040018
Abstract

Ever since the metabolic fate of carbohydrates in the body has become associated with the function of insulin, biochemists have been concerned with the question as to how the pancreatic hormone affects glucose so as to render it utilizable. Macleod1 early realized that the very rapid fall in blood sugar that sets in almost immediately after injection of insulin suggests that some process occurring in the blood itself must be responsible for it—an increased glycolysis. There is widespread agreement among investigators, however, that insulin does not directly influence the rate of glycolysis or sugar decomposition.

A second explanation, which also was suggested early in the investigation of insulin, involves the possibility that it might have some influence on the properties of sugars so as to render them more labile in metabolism. The stereochemical character of glucose lends tenability to such an hypothesis. Several investigators, in fact, believed that they

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