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January 23, 1926

SEROLOGIC STUDIES OF PROTEINURIASI. RESULTS OF PRECIPITIN TESTS. FOLLOWING INJECTION OF ANTISTREPTOCOCCIC SERUM AND OF NORMAL HORSE SERUM

JAMA. 1926;86(4):263-264. doi:10.1001/jama.1926.02670300025007
Abstract

Often the physician, in treating a patient, assumes that the presence of protein in the urine is pathognomonic of renal disease. This may be true in a great number of cases, yet a certain percentage of patients coming under the observation of the physician show protein in urine when renal disease cannot be demonstrated. For example, after the ingestion of a heavy protein meal, the urine may show a considerable amount of protein. Occasionally the urine of a patient suffering with a metabolic disease contains protein in spite of the fact that renal disease is not demonstrable.

Sollmann and Brown,1 in 1901, noted the presence of protein in the urine of human beings and animals after its parenteral introduction. They did not, however, use serologic methods to identify the protein excreted.

Cramer,2 in 1908, noted that the injection of egg white and ox serum into the dog produced

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