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Article
January 23, 1926

THE EFFECT OF GAS ANESTHETICS USED IN LABORON THE BLEEDING AND COAGULATION TIME OF THE NEW-BORN

JAMA. 1926;86(4):265-267. doi:10.1001/jama.1926.02670300027009
Abstract

A considerable discrepancy exists among the values obtained by many observers for the normal bleeding and coagulation time of the blood in the new-born. These figures for both bleeding time and coagulation time vary from three minutes to ten minutes.1 When similar methods of technic are used, it is obvious that there is some influential factor that must be taken into consideration. In an endeavor to discover this factor, the bleeding and coagulation time was taken on 600 infants at birth and during the first ten days of life, the entire series covering a space of two years.

MATERIAL  Of the 600 cases in this series, 200 patients were delivered with ethylene, 200 with nitrous oxide, and the remaining 200 without an anesthetic. This was easily made possible by the condition existing in the obstetric department whereby one obstetrician used ethylene in his cases, and another used nitrous oxide.

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