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Article
April 12, 1924

BLOOD REACTION IN ETHYLENE AND NITROUS OXID ANESTHESIA

Author Affiliations

MADISON, WIS.
From the Laboratories of Pharmacology and Physiological Chemistry of the University of Wisconsin Medical School.

JAMA. 1924;82(15):1162-1165. doi:10.1001/jama.1924.02650410004002
Abstract

The most noteworthy recent event in the development of anesthesia has been the revival of interest in ethylene as an anesthetic agent. This has occurred as a result of the experiments undertaken by Luckhardt and Carter,1 which were independently confirmed by Brown,2 and through the favorable clinical reports of the gas as a general anesthetic when used with oxygen, as noted by Luckhardt and Carter,3 Luckhardt and Lewis,4 and Lundy.5

In comparing ethylene with ether as a general anesthetic, one is immediately struck with the more favorable postanesthetic condition under ethylene. Luckhardt and Lewis 4 report prompt recovery in every instance under ethylene-oxygen, and postoperative vomiting in only 30.2 per cent, of a large series of cases; while, in a comparable series under ether, the postoperative vomiting followed in 76.6 per cent, of the patients. So far, no untoward effects following ethylene have been reported.

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