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Article
April 12, 1924

CITRATED BLOOD TRANSFUSION: AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF THE TOXICITY OF SODIUM CITRATE IN EXSANGUINATED DOGS

Author Affiliations

Assistant in Surgery and Assistant Professor of Surgery, Respectively, University of Minnesota Medical School MINNEAPOLIS
From the laboratory of Experimental Surgery, University of Minnesota Medical School.

JAMA. 1924;82(15):1187-1189. doi:10.1001/jama.1924.02650410029012
Abstract

Recently Henderson and Haggard1 published an article concerning certain phases of hemorrhage. Their experimental work was carried out on nonanesthetized dogs which had been subjected to the removal of quantities of blood equaling 0.25 per cent, of the body weight every five minutes over a period of from one to two hours until the systolic pressure reached 28 mm. of mercury. They found that the chances of survival or death were about equal in these exsanguinated animals if they were left to themselves. They add further that:

The arterial pressure was taken by means of a mercury manometer connected temporarily to the femoral artery. It was found important that the fluid in the cannula should be merely sodium chlorid solution. The effect of introducing inadvertently from the manometer even a small amount of sodium citrate after hemorrhage was almost immediately fatal —a point of some importance, perhaps, in relation

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