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Article
January 30, 1926

OSTEOMYELITIS OF THE INNOMINATE BONEREASONS FOR RARITY OF LOCATION; METHODS OF REPAIR, OPERATIVE AND OTHERWISE

JAMA. 1926;86(5):341-346. doi:10.1001/jama.1926.02670310023008
Abstract

I employ the term osteomyelitis in the title of this paper not in its clinical but rather in its pathologic significance. It is a notable fact that the innominate bone is not frequently the site of any inflammatory processes. Not more than 7 per cent, of all osteomyelitic lesions in bone occur here. So far as tuberculous lesions are concerned, I do not know the figures, but feel confident that the percentage is even less. Somewhat the same thing is true of other flat bones, as the skull, the scapulae and the ribs.

There must be some explanation for this relative exemption, an explanation that has to do with the protection these structures get from certain influences that are provocative of infection in bone. The rôle played by trauma in the incidence of disease conditions, no matter what they are, is a moot question. Workmen's compensation laws and accident insurance

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