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Article
April 19, 1924

CARBON TETRACHLORID POISONING: REPORT OF TWO FATAL CASES AND A SERIES OF ANIMAL EXPERIMENTS

Author Affiliations

ALMIRANTE, PANAMA; BOSTON
From the Panama Division of the United Fruit Company, and from the pathologic laboratory of the Boston City Hospital.

JAMA. 1924;82(16):1254-1256. doi:10.1001/jama.1924.02650420018010
Abstract

Since Hall1 proposed about two years ago the use of carbon tetrachlorid for the removal of hookworms harbored in human beings, this substance has been generally recognized as an effective anthelmintic, and is extensively employed for combating hookworm disease in tropical regions. The results have been, in general, better than those with any other drug that has heretofore been used for the same purpose.

Effective as it is, the use of this drug is not always unaccompanied by certain ill effects. There have already been a number of cases reported showing the toxic property of this drug, manifested in ways varying from a mild, transient attack of dizziness, headache and nausea to such severe symptoms as fever, pain, vomiting, or even convulsions and death.

Clinically there is a great deal of individual variation in the reaction to the drug. Many persons show no ill after-effects whatever, others show mild

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