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Article
February 6, 1926

THE TECHNIC OF MEDICATION: A SERIES OF ARTICLES ON THE METHODS OF PRESCRIBING AND PREPARING, THE INDICATIONS FOR, AND THE USES OF VARIOUS MEDICAMENTS

JAMA. 1926;86(6):415-417. doi:10.1001/jama.1926.26720320002010b
Abstract

DIADERMIC ADMINISTRATION  Diadermic administration is not a quick or a direct way of getting medicaments into the circulation, but it secures an evenness and constancy of medication that no other route supplies. The main objection to it is the uncertainty regarding the dosage. Since absorption is much less, the quantity applied is much larger than that which would be used internally. Diadermic administration is useful when action on the alimentary canal is to be avoided, or when it is necessary to push the medicine into the system by all possible routes. The application is made in places in which the skin is thin, as free from hair as possible, and well supplied with lymphatics, as on the flexor surfaces of the body. It is often well to use the various available surfaces in regular sequence; thus, first day, inner surface of left arm; second day, left flank and groin; third

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