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Article
February 13, 1926

FACTORS INFLUENCING APPENDICITIS MORTALITY: RESULTS IN ELEVEN THOUSAND FOUR HUNDRED CASES

JAMA. 1926;86(7):469-471. doi:10.1001/jama.1926.02670330013005

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Abstract

The possible reasons for the present recorded mortality resulting from appendical infections and inflammations and their surgical treatment merit continued discussion and study. There is pressing need for the observance of pertinent factors that have a definite bearing on the end-result and the mortality that is encountered. There is an apparent laxity, nearly bordering on indifference, as to our attitude toward this surgical entity. Ochsner, whose name will ever be associated with appendicitis, in one of his last discussions of this disease and its treatment, remarked that nowadays almost any one attempted to perform an appendectomy, and if the disease was in its early stage, with the aid of modern surgical asepsis, his surgery resulted in a recovery. Ochsner further said that when one is confronted with the complications that do occur, when the condition is more than a simple inflammation, then the end-result and a low or a high

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