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Article
February 13, 1926

THE FREQUENCY OF BOTULISM: A REPORT OF OUTBREAKS FROM 1922 TO 1926

JAMA. 1926;86(7):482-483. doi:10.1001/jama.1926.26720330001010
Abstract

Occasional outbreaks of botulism continue to be reported in the United States. The rarity of the disease, often stressed by various writers, has apparently never been questioned. The publicity usually attendant on outbreaks has been less in recent years, but it would appear to be far in excess if one considers comparatively the recorded morbidity and mortality.

There is, however, and perhaps rightly so, great importance placed on each outbreak because of its fatal sequence to those who consume the contaminated and toxic food. Likewise, the relation of the intoxication to our preserved food supply is always decidedly menacing, as this supply is rapidly becoming economically more important in American households.

Lewis,1 Jellinek,2 McCracken,3 Geiger, Meyer and Dickson4 and Geiger5 have summarized the data available since 1899. It may be of interest again to summarize the data to date (1926), going back, however, to the

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