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Article
February 20, 1926

ERYSIPELOID AND SWINE ERYSIPELAS IN MAN: A CLINICAL AND BACTERIOLOGIC REVIEW; SWINE ERYSIPELAS IN THE UNITED STATES

JAMA. 1926;86(8):536-541. doi:10.1001/jama.1926.02670340014006
Abstract

Tilbury Fox1 was apparently the first to describe what is now generally designated as erysipeloid. In 1873, he briefly described two instances of an eruption clinically conforming with that disease. In the same year Monant Baker2 under the name of erythema serpens described a number of cases occurring exclusively on the hands of cooks and butchers, and on those handling game and rabbit skins. His description of the eruption was essentially the same that Rosenbach subsequently described.

Rosenbach aptly designated the eruption as erysipeloid (now generally known as erysipeloid of Rosenbach) and published in 18843 and in 18874 the results of his study. He described the eruption as an erysipelas-like affection, frequently encountered in cooks, kitchen workers, butchers and those who handle game and fish, and in shopkeepers who handle cheese or herring, manifesting itself chiefly about the fingers and hands, and characterized by a slowly

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