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Article
February 27, 1926

HILUM TUBERCULOSIS: RELATIVE VALUE OF SYMPTOMS, PHYSICAL SIGNS AND ROENTGEN-RAY FINDINGS IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF BRONCHIAL GLAND TUBERCULOSIS

Author Affiliations

BOSTON
From the Massachusetts Department' of Public Health.

JAMA. 1926;86(9):598-601. doi:10.1001/jama.1926.02670350008003
Abstract

In the weekly report of the state health department to the Boston Medical and Surgical Journal1 appears for the first time the item, "Tuberculosis, hilum, sixty-one cases." This, of course, is a direct result of the activity of the Massachusetts Department of Public Health in finding bronchial gland tuberculosis among the school children of the state. This means that the disease is now recognized as an entity and that it can be diagnosed with more or less certainty.

In order to realize fully the significance of this report, it is necessary to trace briefly the history of this disease. Up till 1910-1911, it was generally accepted that tuberculosis begins at the apex of the lung, particularly the right apex. Already there were those, however, who believed in pulmonary lymphatic tuberculosis, some holding that it was primary, and some, secondary to a pulmonary lesion. Lymph gland tuberculosis was thought to

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