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Article
May 10, 1924

CHRONIC MYELOGENOUS LEUKEMIA: AGE INCIDENCE, DURATION, AND BENEFIT DERIVED FROM IRRADIATION

Author Affiliations

BOSTON
From the Medical Service of the Collis P. Huntington Memorial Hospital of Harvard University.

JAMA. 1924;82(19):1489-1494. doi:10.1001/jama.1924.02650450001001
Abstract

Irradiation treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia was first undertaken by Senn 1 in 1903, using long wave length roentgen rays. It was not until after Rénon, Degrais and Desbouis,2 in 1913, and Ordway,3 in 1917, reported the effect of radium on the disease that adequate irradiation was given at all frequently so as to produce very often marked alleviation of symptoms. In recent years and with the advent of short wave length roentgen-ray therapy, constantly greater numbers of these patients in an increasing number of localities are receiving intensive irradiation with great benefit. The reports by Ordway,4 Peabody,5 Giffin,6 Vogel,7 Wood 8 and Rosenthal9 are among those that indicate the value of this form of treatment.

It is recognized that irradiation frequently brings about striking remissions of the disease, so that patients who are often in a distressing and sometimes an apparently serious

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