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Article
March 6, 1926

THE TECHNIC OF MEDICATION: A SERIES OF ARTICLES ON THE METHODS OF PRESCRIBING AND PREPARING, THE INDICATIONS FOR, AND THE USES OF VARIOUS MEDICAMENTS

Author Affiliations

Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine, Rush Medical College CHICAGO

JAMA. 1926;86(10):687-689. doi:10.1001/jama.1926.26720360003012
Abstract

PERLINGUAL ADMINISTRATION  It seems that the absorptive power of the mucous membrane of the mouth and tongue and especially that underneath the tongue, and the rapidity with which medicaments can be made to enter the systemic circulation, are not sufficiently appreciated by physicians. The sublingual space, it is asserted, offers a more direct entry into the general circulation than does the stomach.Paulson,25 who first devised this method thirty years ago, asks any one to be "good enough to refresh his memory by looking in the nearest mirror at the sublingual space, noting the thin membrane, the considerable area, and the large veins, denoting a free flow and return of blood. The space is always smooth, never furred like the tongue, never shielded by mucus, as the stomach always is when in active rebellion or, may be, masked by half-digested food." The surprising efficiency of perlingual administration might further

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