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Article
March 13, 1926

SKIN REACTIONS WITH FILTRATE OF KOCH STRAIN OF BACILLUS TUBERCULOSIS

JAMA. 1926;86(11):747. doi:10.1001/jama.1926.02670370017007

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Abstract

The so-called Koch strain of the tubercle bacillus is an avirulent culture which gives a profuse growth overnight on the ordinary solid and fluid nutrient mediums. It was thought well to study whether the growth of the bacillus in broth might produce a substance that, injected intracutaneously, would give a skin reaction. The strain used was obtained from Dr. F. G. Novy in Ann Arbor, Mich., who brought it from Dr. Koch's laboratory in 1888. It was originally a virulent strain.

Transplants from solid medium were made into nutrient broth containing 0.1 per cent dextrose and 0.1 per cent dibasic sodium phosphate in place of the sodium chloride of the ordinary broth. A four day growth was passed through Berkefeld N filters, and the filtrate diluted with physiologic sodium chloride solution for skin tests. Skin reactions were obtained in normal adult persons in dilutions up to 1: 50 injected intracutaneously

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