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Article
March 13, 1926

THE TECHNIC OF MEDICATION: A SERIES OF ARTICLES ON THE METHODS OF PRESCRIBING AND PREPARING, THE INDICATIONS FOR, AND THE USES OF VARIOUS MEDICAMENTS

JAMA. 1926;86(11):750-751. doi:10.1001/jama.1926.26720370003009
Abstract

OTHER MEANS OF LESSENING TASTE  When it is impossible to make a medicine tasteless, attempts should be made to minimize its taste. Among drugs of identical action, the one whose taste or odor is least offensive should be chosen. Potassium citrate is preferable to potassium acetate, creosote carbonate to creosote, betanapthol to naphthalene.Solutions of colloidal substances, such as mucilage, starch paste, and milk, are capable of markedly diminishing the taste of all, but most especially of sour, saline and acrid substances. Milk forms a most useful vehicle for the administration of such medicaments as iodides, bromides and chloral hydrate. It is instructive in this connection to compare the taste of a 1 per cent solution of sodium iodide in water and in milk, or of a 1 per cent solution of citric acid in water and in starch water.The policy of administering medicaments in food is one that

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