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Article
April 10, 1926

OMENTOPEXY IN CIRRHOSIS OF THE LIVER: REPORT OF CASE

JAMA. 1926;86(15):1123-1125. doi:10.1001/jama.1926.02670410019008
Abstract

Cases of atrophic cirrhosis of the liver are still sufficiently common to attract the surgeon's attention for the relief of the ascites. These patients with various complicated lesions, and with a shaky cardiovasculorenal tripod, do not make desirable operative risks, and careful judgment is advisable in their selection.

The temptation to relieve the accumulations of fluid in the abdomen by repeated paracentesis is one to which the physician frequently succumbs. That such treatment is without substantial avail has long been known.

Binnie, quoting Wynter, says, "The price paid for the relief of the distention is the sacrifice of so much nutrient fluid," and Osler confirms this, stating that "the average duration of life in atrophic cirrhosis, after the commencement of tapping, is about fourteen weeks."

Omentopexy, or epiplopexy, known as Talma's operation, also termed Morrison's operation and Narath's operation, is a surgical procedure devised on a truly scientific basis, with

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