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Article
June 28, 1924

PSYCHOLOGY IN MEDICAL PRACTICE AND LEGISLATION: THE PROFESSION'S DUTY TO ITSELF AND TO THE NATION

JAMA. 1924;82(26):2100-2102. doi:10.1001/jama.1924.02650520006004

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Abstract

In 1921, the medical profession of New Jersey won the hardest fight of its history.

By united demand of all its members, it compelled the state to require chiropractors to possess some education, and it prevented the legislature from licensing insufficiently educated osteopaths to practice medicine and surgery.

The profession was stirred to action by the previous legislature's passage of a chiropractic law which omitted the mandatory educational requirements present in all previous licensing acts.

At this time (1920) the medical profession was held in such political contempt that the assembly refused it a hearing while the bill was under discussion. The resulting resentment was so general that, in answer to a call from the Welfare Committee, over one thousand physicians appeared at the state house at one time.

In the history of medicine, new cults have from time to time arisen, protests against the medical customs of the day;

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