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Article
May 15, 1926

LEAD POISONING IN NURSING INFANTS: REPORT OF TWO CASES DUE TO THE USE OF LEAD NIPPLE SHIELDS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Department of the Diseases of Children, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, and the Babies' Hospital of New York.

JAMA. 1926;86(20):1514-1516. doi:10.1001/jama.1926.02670460022007
Abstract

Lead poisoning in children is well known though not common. Lead poisoning in nursing infants is extremely rare. The previously reported sources of lead poisoning during the nursing age are varied. Congenital lead poisoning is rare. The two cases of Ganyaire1 and of LeGrand and Winter1 are undoubtedly authentic, as lead was demonstrated in the placental, hepatic and cerebral tissues of two infants dying in the first days of life. The excretion of lead in the breast milk of mothers poisoned by the use of lead-containing skin cosmetics and hair dyes was the source of lead poisoning in several young infants among the cases recorded by Dufour.2 Suzuki and Kaneko3 have recently reported that the long observed serous meningitis in Japanese infants is due to white lead powder used as a cosmetic by young Japanese mothers. One cannot be certain that the nursing infants may not

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