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Article
May 22, 1926

THE RECOGNITION OF A BIOLOGIC DIFFERENTIATION IN THE WHITE BLOOD CELLS: WITH ESPECIAL REFERENCE TO BLOOD TRANSFUSION

JAMA. 1926;86(21):1593-1597. doi:10.1001/jama.1926.02670470001001
Abstract

The development of the supravital technic for the study of living blood cells in vitro1 has made available, for the first time, a simple, adequate method for the qualitative analysis of the white blood cells. It was the attempted application of this procedure to a study of the problem of the possible relationship of the white blood cells to the unexplained reactions following the transfusion of matched red blood cells that led to the results presented briefly at this time.

During some experiments on rabbits, several years ago, in which two groups of individually matched animals were used for repeated transfusions of blood, it was noted that there was a marked difference in the clinical manifestations, following transfusion in certain recipients. A study of the peripheral blood at frequent intervals during the occasional, more severe, clinical reactions following the matched blood transfusions directed our attention to the white blood

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