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Article
May 22, 1926

THE TECHNIC OF MEDICATION: A SERIES OF ARTICLES ON THE METHODS OF PRESCRIBING AND PREPARING, THE INDICATIONS FOR, AND THE USES OF VARIOUS MEDICAMENTS

JAMA. 1926;86(21):1623-1625. doi:10.1001/jama.1926.26720470012007a
Abstract

SHAKE MIXTURES  As previously stated, the prescribing of suspensions should, if possible, be avoided. Occasions may, however, arise when it may be desirable to suspend, in watery fluid, either insoluble solids or oils. In the former case, we speak of "shake mixtures" or merely "mixtures"; in the latter case, of "emulsions."Mixtures, in the pharmacopeial sense, are aqueous liquid preparations that contain finely divided solid matter in partial suspension. Hence, an official mixture is always a cloudy or muddy liquid; as, however, the word is applied in a popular sense to any combination of different ingredients, the term "shake mixture" is more distinctive, and will be used here.Shake mixtures enable us to administer insoluble substances in fluid form. They have the advantage over powders, divided into separate doses in an appropriate manner, of being less laborious in preparation and therefore somewhat less expensive. Such mixtures have the disadvantage, however,

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