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Article
May 29, 1926

THE HUMORAL MECHANISM AND HORMONE OF EXTERNAL PANCREATIC SECRETION

JAMA. 1926;86(22):1698. doi:10.1001/jama.1926.02670480028010
Abstract

The remarkable secretory responses that can be secured through stimulation of certain nerves that supply the salivary glands are among the classic demonstrations of experimental physiology. Interruption of the nervous paths, either mechanically or through the action of drugs, is promptly followed by cessation of the characteristic function. Such observations have doubtless been responsible to a considerable degree for the widespread assumption that secretion in general occurs primarily in response to excitation of active cells through nervous paths. In recent years, however, evidence has accumulated to indicate that the promotion of secretory activity can be secured through the blood channels as well as the extrinsic nerves. This is currently described as the humoral, in contrast with the nervous, secretory mechanism.

Ivy and Farrell1 recently demonstrated that a gastric pouch can be transplanted extra-abdominally into the mammary gland after severance of all nervous connections of the stomach fragment. Such transplants

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