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Article
January 14, 1933

NONSPECIFIC IMMUNOTRANSFUSIONS IN HEMOLYTIC STREPTOCOCCUS SEPTICEMIA: ANALYSIS OF BLOOD CHANGES BY THE SCHILLING METHOD

Author Affiliations

GERMANTOWN, PA.
From the Philadelphia General Hospital.

JAMA. 1933;100(2):100-102. doi:10.1001/jama.1933.02740020018005
Abstract

This report deals with a case of hemolytic streptococcus septicemia apparently cured by a series of immunotransfusions, five being nonspecific and the final one specific.

The work is in the nature of a supplement to that of Brody and Crocker,1 in which another patient with hemolytic streptococcus septicemia was treated first by ordinary transfusions and a series of intravenous antiseptics — including mercurochrome-220 soluble, metaphen and Pregl's solution of iodine—without improvement, and later by specific immunotransfusions with apparent cure. Our current modification in therapy, using nonspecific immunotransfusions, was recommended by Dr. Brody.

B. Y. a Negro woman, aged 35, entered the medical wards of Philadelphia General Hospital in the service of Dr. A. A. Stevens, Dec. 16, 1931, complaining of pain in numerous joints, chills, fever and weakness.

The onset of the present illness occurred, Dec. 3, 1931, with a violent chill, profuse sweat, stiffness, soreness, and moderate swelling

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