[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.204.176.125. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
January 21, 1933

TWO MECHANISMS IN THE PRODUCTION OF DUROZIEZ'S SIGN: THEIR DIAGNOSTIC SIGNIFICANCE AND A CLINICAL TEST FOR DIFFERENTIATING BETWEEN THEM

Author Affiliations

BOSTON
From the Medical Research Laboratories of the Beth Israel Hospital and the Department of Medicine, Harvard University Medical School.

JAMA. 1933;100(3):173-177. doi:10.1001/jama.1933.02740030021007
Abstract

The combination of an aortic diastolic murmur and peripheral signs, such as capillary pulse, wide pulse pressure, and Duroziez's sign, readily establishes the diagnosis of aortic insufficiency. In certain instances, however, the diagnosis is beset with difficulties. A diastolic murmur may be heard along the left border of the sternum in a patient with mitral stenosis, and the possibility of this murmur being due to the Graham Steell phenomenon presents itself. Under such conditions the presence or absence of the peripheral signs of aortic regurgitation assumes considerable importance. In other patients the peripheral signs of aortic regurgitation may be clearly evident, but the presence of the diastolic murmur may be doubtful.

Our purpose in this communication is to present the results of a study which permit a clearer understanding of the meaning of peripheral vascular signs and so help to resolve the clinical difficulties mentioned. Duroziez's sign has been the

×