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Article
June 12, 1926

TYPES OF NEUROSYPHILIS IN RELATION TO TREATMENT

JAMA. 1926;86(24):1815-1818. doi:10.1001/jama.1926.02670500003002
Abstract

It is a well established fact that syphilis of the nervous system varies in the widest possible manner in its amenability to treatment. At one extreme we have those cases of neurosyphilis in which the spinal fluid becomes completely and permanently negative after a few intravenous injections of arsphenamine, and sometimes even spontaneously without treatment; while at the other end of the scale stand those cases which prove intractable to all ordinary methods of antisyphilitic treatment, and which in general develop sooner or later into outspoken cases of tabes or general paralysis. Now it is not too much to say that some years ago—before the introduction of intraspinal therapy and its modifications in the form of intracisternal and intraventricular injections,1 and especially tryparsamide2 and the malaria treatment3—it was not of especial practical importance to discriminate between these two broadly divisible types of neurosyphilis; for the vast

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